ISOBEL O’CONNOR, SOUTH AFRICA

Isobel O’Connor holds a fine art degree from the Johannesburg College of Art. She taught in the art department of the Natal Technicon for several years before embarking on extensive travels and settling abroad. She focused on private commissions during her time overseas as well as committed to freelance for Harper’s Bazaar. Her fashion illustrations attracted international recognition and awards. In 2012 she returned to South Africa and dedicates herself full-time to fine art again. She works predominantly in pastels and charcoal. Her work reveals contradiction,  from very fluid charcoal shading techniques to detailed, photographic sketching; these are calculated means to capture the subject.  Her main focus remains on searching for the soul through the eyes of the subject. The viewer is drawn into an intense experience of being looked at as well as a powerful sensation of looking “into”.

 

AVAILABLE ARTWORKS
Vision Statement

“The main thing is to be moved, to love, to hope, to tremble, to live.”
(Auguste Rodin)

 
VIEWING TIMES
Mon - Sat | 09:00 - 17:30
Sun | 09:00 - 17:00

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CONTACT | ADDRESS
ODA Gallery
42 Huguenot Street
Franschhoek
Western Cape, South Africa

+27 837743603
patrizia@odagallery.co.za

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For more information visit odagallery.co.za or
send an email to patrizia@odagallery.co.za Thank you.
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'FOCUS ON WOMEN' Exhibition by Mbongeni Fakudze The exhibition can be viewed at ODA fine art between the 6th and 30th of August 2017 ------------------ Mbongeni Fakudze is an emerging mixed media fine artist born in Swaziland in 1982 and currently living and working in Johannesburg, South Africa. Mbongeni's body of work focuses on the contemporary African women, their beauty, pride, unique stance but also addresses issues that women face in a society that undergoes a roller-coaster ride of a transition from a traditional African culture to a modern democratic society where women enjoy equal rights - or so on paper at least! The artist carefully weaves symbolism into his powerful portraits, such as pieces of money (the lobola system is still in place where a groom has to pay money to the parents of his future wife), or women wearing head scarves as a symbol of womanhood and power. But his great strength lies in the understanding of the ways in which objects and images impress upon us via essences of colour, shape and texture and how this affect us as deeply as the physical form to which they are ordinarily attached. The paintings are thus held in an innovative balance between a focus on form and the endless associativity they inspire. ARTIST STATEMENT ‘My art explores the concept of solidity versus fluidity versus gaseousness. I’ve always seen the world through the microscopic eye of an atomic physicist and simultaneously the cosmic eye of an astrophysicist and herein lies the two extremes of physical existence…of my existence. In observing my strokes, one can observe that the surface of the canvas and the surface of the skin of my subjects are broken down and disintegrated. I use my expressive strokes to articulate a discontinuity in both the skin of my subject and in the surface of the canvas… In this series of female portraits I explore the concept of the un-solidness of identity … gaseous, fluid and solid simultaneously… fluidity of identity… which layer, which state of matter truly represents the person.’

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